Villadoz

Villadoz

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Villadoz

Coordinates: 41°10′N 1°17′W / 41.167°N 1.283°W / 41.167; -1.283Coordinates: 41°10′N 1°17′W / 41.167°N 1.283°W / 41.167; -1.283

Country
Spain

Autonomous community
Aragon

Province
Zaragoza

Comarca
Campo de Daroca

Area

 • Total
17 km2 (7 sq mi)

Population (2004)

 • Total
88

 • Density
5.2/km2 (13/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Villadoz is a municipality located in the province of Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain. According to the 2010 census,[1] the municipality has a population of 83 inhabitants.
The town is located close to the Sierra del Peco mountain range.[2]

Contents

1 History
2 Festivities
3 Places of interest
4 Transports and communications
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

History[edit]
Romans archaeological remains dated in the 2nd century B.C. have been found inside the municipal limit: remains of lime near of the river Huerva that they seem to be the base of a Roman bridge, Roman villas in the zone known as “Fuente del Manco” (Source of the Shortage) and part of the Roman causeway that was joining “Caecesaraugusta” (Zaragoza) with Saguntum (Sagunto) and Valentia (Valencia) near the Roman villas. Also they have found numerous objects of Roman ceramics in fields of culture of the zone of “Fuente del Manco”.
In the year 1248, for privilege of Jaime I of Aragon, this place comes undone of Daroca’s dependence, happening to form a part of “Sesma de Langa” in the Community of Daroca’s Villages, which were depending directly on the king, lasting this administrative regime up to the death of Fernando VII of Spain in 1833, being disuelta already in 1838. The parochial church of Mudejar Aragonese art dedicated to Santiago Apostle was built in fist years, also in this time was built the hermitages dedicated to Saint Bartholome are built (demolished) and to Mary Magdalene (in ruins).
In the middle of the 19th century there were destroyed the hermitages of Saint Bartholome and of Mary Magdalene. There is constructed a hermitage dedicated to the new patron saint of the village: Saint Martin of Tours. In 1845 the Villarroya del Campo village is declared neighborhood of Villadoz. The neighborhood became free at the end of the same century.
In 1933 the industry came to Villadoz, thanks to the railway network Zaragoza – Caminreal administered by the comp
원정녀

Valle Peligna

This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Italian. (September 2016) Click [show] for important translation instructions. 

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View of Valle Peligna.

The Valle Peligna, also known as Conca di Sulmona, is a plateau in central Abruzzo, southern Italy, included in the province of L’Aquila. It has a surface of some 100 km².
The valley takes its name from the Greek term peline, meaning “muddy”. This refers to prehistoric times, when it was occupied by a lake which disappeared after a series of earthquakes approximately 300,000 years ago, leaving the land full of marshes but fertile. The former barrier between the lake and the sea was in what are now the gorges of Popoli. Three hills near Sulmona are the relics of the single island in the lake.
The valley is crossed by the rivers Aterno and Sagittario. In addition to Sulmona, the main centers in the plateau include Raiano, Vittorito, Corfinio, Pratola Peligna and Pacentro.
Historically, it was inhabited by the Paeligni, a group of Pelasgians who migrated from Asia Minor in the 12th century BC.
Coordinates: 42°04′49″N 13°53′16″E / 42.08028°N 13.88778°E / 42.08028; 13.88778

밤헌터

Paul Lazarus

For the English footballer, see Paul Lazarus (footballer).

Paul Lazarus

Born
October 25, 1954
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US

Occupation
Director

Paul Lazarus is an American director, producer and writer of film, television and theatre.
He graduated from Dartmouth College, and apprenticed with the Royal Shakespeare Company in England.[1]

Contents

1 Directing credits
2 Theatre credits
3 Other work
4 Awards and nominations
5 External links and references

Directing credits[edit]

Big Time Rush
I’m in the Band
Las Vegas
Psych
Ugly Betty
In Case of Emergency
Samantha Who?
Jake in Progress
Grounded for Life
Kristin
Seven Girlfriends (feature film directorial debut, 1999)
Everybody Loves Raymond
Buddies
Partners
Murder, She Wrote
Ned & Stacey
Baywatch
2gether: The Series
Friends
Melrose Place
Models Inc.
Dream On
Class of ’96
Jack’s Place
Mad About You
Beverly Hills, 90210
L.A. Law
Teech
Pretty Little Liars
True Jackson, VP
The Middle

Theatre credits[edit]
In the early 90s, he served as the Artistic Director of the historic Pasadena Playhouse. Lazarus has directed over eighty plays and musicals. His play, A Tale of Charles Dickens, co-written with Janet Jones, was produced and recorded for radio by Los Angeles Theater Works in association with the Antaeus Theater Company. Other credits include directing Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues, Personals (which was written by Marta Kauffman, David Crane, Stephen Schwartz and Alan Menken), Kristin Chenoweth in her solo concert debut, The People vs. Mona, Mark St. Germain’s Camping With Henry And Tom (starring Robert Prosky, Ronny Cox and John Cunningham) and The 24th Day (starring Noah Wyle and Peter Berg).[2]
Other work[edit]
Lazarus also went on to voice direct Dreamworks Animation’s only direct to video film Joseph: King of Dreams in 2000.
Awards and nominations[edit]

Los Angeles Dramalogue Award: Best Director (The 24th Day) WON
Drama Desk Award: Best Director (Personals)

External links and references[edit]

^ Paul Lazarus biography at official website
^ Paul Lazarus Biography (1954–) Film Reference

Official website
LAist Interview
Online 49er Interview
FilmMakerMagazine
Paul Lazarus at the Internet Movie Database

밤헌터

John Moffat Fugui

The Right Honourable
John Moffat Fugui
MP

Minister for the Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology

In office
27 August 2010 – 22 October 2012

Prime Minister
Danny Philip (until 16 November 2011);
then Gordon Darcy Lilo

Succeeded by
Bradley Tovosia

Member of Parliament
for Central Honiara

Incumbent

Assumed office
4 August 2010

Preceded by
Nelson Ne’e

Personal details

Born
September 9, 1961
Fourau, Malaita Province

Political party
Independent

Alma mater
University of Hawai’i

John Moffat Fugui (born September 9, 1961 in Fourau, Malaita Province[1]) is a Solomon Islands politician.
He obtained his first Master’s degree at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, then two more at the University of Hawai’i in the United States, where he then also obtained his PhD. He subsequently worked as a political adviser to the Solomon Islands government.[1]
His career in national politics began when he was elected to Parliament as the member for Central Honiara (the capital city) in the August 2010 general election, standing as an independent candidate. He was then appointed Minister for the Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology in Prime Minister Danny Philip’s Cabinet.[1][2] When Gordon Darcy Lilo replaced Philip as Prime Minister in November 2011, Fugui retained his position in government.[3]
On 22 October 2012, Fugui left the government. He announced that he had resigned because he had had no permanent secretary for seven months; Prime Minister Lilo stated that he had sacked him for siding with the Opposition.[4] Lilo replaced him with Bradley Tovosia.[5]
Following the 2014 general election, in which he retained his seat, Fugui was elected Deputy Speaker of the National Parliament, on 17 December.[6]
References[edit]

^ a b c Biography on the website of the Parliament of Solomon Islands
^ 2010 election data, Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corporation
^ “Abana, Maelanga likely candidates for DPM”, Solomon Star, 21 November 2011
^ “I resigned, says Fugui”, Solomon Star, 23 October 2012
^ “Ministers Fired and Replaced”, Solomon Times, 23 October 2012
^ “Nasiu elected Speaker, Fugui as Deputy”, The Island Sun, 18 December 2014

일베야

Norcross, Georgia

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Norcross, Georgia

City

Downtown Norcross

Motto: “A place to Imagine”

Location in Gwinnett County and the state of Georgia

Norcross

Location in Metro Atlanta

Coordinates: 33°56′N 84°13′W / 33.933°N 84.217°W / 33.933; -84.217Coordinates: 33°56′N 84°13′W / 33.933°N 84.217°W / 33.933; -84.217

Country
United States

State
Georgia

County
Gwinnett

Area

 • Total
4.65 sq mi (12.05 km2)

 • Land
4.64 sq mi (12.02 km2)

 • Water
0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)

Elevation
1,047 ft (319 m)

Population (2010)

 • Total
9,116

 • Density
1,963/sq mi (758.1/km2)

Time zone
Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)

 • Summer (DST)
EDT (UTC-4)

ZIP codes
30003, 30010, 30071, 30091, 30093

Area code(s)
770

FIPS code
13-55776[1]

GNIS feature ID
0319621[2]

Website
www.norcrossga.net

Norcross is a city in Gwinnett County, Georgia, United States. The population as of the 2010 census was 9,116,[3] while in 2015 the estimated population was 16,634.[4] It is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area, which is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Gainesville combined statistical area.

Contents

1 History
2 Geography
3 Transit systems
4 Demographics
5 Education

5.1 Primary and secondary schools
5.2 Public libraries

6 Local companies
7 Media
8 Filming
9 References
10 External links

History[edit]

This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Named for former Atlanta Mayor Jonathan Norcross, it was chartered as a town on October 26, 1870.
The city sits along the Eastern Continental Divide. Streams to the west of the city center travel to the Chattahoochee River and ultimately the Gulf of Mexico, while streams to the east flow to the Yellow River, a tributary of the Ocmulgee River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean north of Brunswick. This divide, or ridge, played a significant role in the early settlement of the area.
미소넷

Thornton Wilson

Thornton A. Wilson

Born
Thornton Arnold Wilson
(1921-02-08)February 8, 1921
Sikeston, Missouri, U.S.

Died
April 10, 1999(1999-04-10) (aged 78)
Palm Springs, California, U.S.

Citizenship
American

Alma mater
Iowa State University (BS)
California Institute of Technology (MS)

Occupation
Former CEO, Boeing

Spouse(s)
Grace Wilson

Thornton “T” Arnold Wilson (February 8, 1921 – April 10, 1999) was the Chairman of the Board and chief executive officer of Boeing corporation.[1][2][3]
Born February 8, 1921, in Sikeston, Missouri, Wilson earned his B.S. degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Iowa State University in Ames and a M.S. degree from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.[3] He also attended the MIT Sloan School of Management’s Sloan Fellows program, but did not graduate.[4] While attending Iowa State, Wilson was a member of the swim team.
Wilson was awarded the NAS Award in Aeronautical Engineering in 1985 from the National Academy of Sciences.[5] In 1992, he was the recipient of the Tony Jannus Award for his distinguished contributions to commercial aviation.
Following his graduation from Iowa State, Wilson joined Boeing in 1943 and worked on bomber programs, notably the swept-wing B-47 Stratojet and B-52 Stratofortress, and also led the proposal team that won the contract for the Minuteman missile.[2] He became company president in 1968, chief executive officer in 1969, and chairman in 1972.[1] Wilson stepped down as CEO in 1986 at age 65, succeeded by Frank Shrontz,[3] and retired as chairman at the end of 1987.[6] He died at age 78 at his winter home in Palm Springs, California.[1]
The main glass gallery of the Museum of Flight in Seattle, opened in 1987, is named for Wilson.[7][8][9]
References[edit]

^ a b c “Boeing’s T.A. Wilson dies”. Spokesman-Review. April 13, 1999. p. A8. 
^ a b Anderson, Peggy (April 13, 1999). “Former Boeing CEO dies at 78”. Ellensburg Daily Record. Associated Press. p. 14. 
^ a b c “Boeing’s T.A. Wilson stepping aside”. Ellensburg Daily Record. UPI. February 25, 1986. p. 5. 
^ MIT Alumni
^ “J. C. Hunsaker Award in Aeronautical Engineering”. National Academy of Sciences. Retrieved 23 March 2014. 
^ “Boeing boss gets big raise”. Ellensburg Daily Record. UPI. March 24, 1988. p. 5. 
^ “Air museum to open big gallery”. Spokane Chronicle. Associated Press. July 6, 1987. p. A5. 
^ “VIP’s expected for flight museum opening”. Ellensburg Da
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포르노